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Rare classic movies on DVD! Our DVD-Rs are region-free, studio titles are Region 1.

Hollywood on Parade Shorts Collection (LTC Exclusive!)

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Quick Overview

Hollywood on Parade (1932 - 1934) is a series of short subjects released by Paramount Pictures./strong>

NO. A-1 (1932)


In the first entry of this series, the show open with a troupe of dancing chorus girls getting a salute from crossed-eyed Ben Turpin. Then the master of ceremonies, Fredric March, brings on the various acts, starting with a pre-teen Mitzi Green), dressed as an adult and singing "Was That the Human Thing to Do?" , followed by Ginger Rogers and Jack Oakie singing-and-dancing to "The Girl Who Used to be You." Then the Three Brox Sisters do a triple imitation of Marlene Dietrich singing 'Falling in Love Again." 'Jack Duffy' does a drunken hillbilly bit involving a lamp post, the the finale has Eddie Peabody, playing a banjo for some chorus girls on a pedestal.

 


NO. A-2 (1932)


In this installment, several stars are on hand to plug The Big Broadcast. Harold Grayson's orchestra plays the "Hollywood on Parade" theme song, and then announcer Stuart Erwin introduces Bing Crosby. Bing doesn't sing straight off because first we get a bit of comedy with George Burns and Gracie Allen. After this though Bing performs "Auf Wiedersehen, My Dear." The rest of the show is devoted to supposedly proving that screen comedians are as funny off-screen as they are in their pictures. Ole Olsen and Chic Johnson and a number of gals are shown on the beach doing their thing.

 


NO. A-3 (1932)


Eddie Kane wanders round the studio back-lot, opening various doors to see which stars pop out.

 


NO. A-3 (1933 version)


In this comedy short subject, Benny Rubin acts the part of a judge, passing judgment on various performers and their acts. He scuffles with Neil Hamilton, scrutinizes Fifi D'Orsay's song, reminisces with Baby Peggy, and shows a song performed at Tom Mix's home.

 


NO. A-4 (1933)


This ostensible documentary short subject features "mailman" Eddie Borden delivering mail to various Hollywood stars including Richard Arlen and his wife Jobyna Ralston, Tom Mix, Bing Crosby, and Mary Pickford. Eddie really wants to be offered something to drink, but no one seems to pick up on his desire. Pickford gives him a lift to the studio, where Eddie is left high and dry.

 


NO. A-6 (1933)


In this installment, Arlen the Great (also sometimes known as Arlen, Richard) puts on a magic show. He shows us a mummy he brought with him from Egypt, which turns out to look vaguely like Frances Dee. The rest of the show revolves around making playing cards come to life. Clark Gable is the King of Hearts, and Tallulah Bankhead is the Queen of Diamonds. Tallulah sings "It Had to Be That Way" perched atop a piano. Finally, we learn that the Jack of Clubs is Lew Cody and the Joker is Buster Keaton. Buster shows Lew and us his "new dry land cruiser."

 


NO. A-8 (1933)


In the Hollywood Hall of Fame - a wax museum - the figure of Eddie Borden comes to life and introduces us to various stars in effigy. Pining over the effigy of Clara Bow, her husband Rex Bell suggests that Eddie get on with Betty Boop. Betty asks Eddie to accompany her in a rendition of "My Silent Love."

 


NO. A-9 (1933)


Portraits on the wall of Willy Pogany's studio come to life.

 


NO. A-12 (1933)


In this short subject, performer Cliff Edwards introduces musical numbers and archival footage of various Hollywood stars, connecting them loosely with a "tribute" to theme songs -- none of which actually are theme songs. Clarence Muse performs a song of his own composition, and a mariachi band plays a musical tribute to Lupe Velez. Other footage shows the stars visiting the Caliente racetrack in Mexico.

 


HOLLYWOOD ON PARADE (1934)


Songwriter Mack Gordon introduces flagpole sitter Shipwreck Kelly, who hoists some girls aloft with him and shows them sights around Hollywood. Various stars appear in staged scenes (El Brendel, Viola Dana, Bing Crosby, Harry Langdon), while others show up in clips from newsreel or promotional footage. Most of the stars are seen in some sort of sporting activity such as tennis or golf.

 


NO. B-1 (1934)


Short film filled with cameo appearances by many of the top film stars of the time. The best scene is at the film premiere, apparently the premiere was a costume event and many of the stars are dressed in various costumes. The stars would stop and pose for the newsreel cameras and then Frankie Darro would go up to them and either ask for an autograph or tell the stars he is there to deliver a telegram. Apparently the stars didn't know they were being filmed for a short subject. This film has a sound track and you can hear many of the stars make remarks to Darro, oblivious to the fact that they were being filmed. Constance Cummings tells Darro "her hands are shaking she is so cold." Paulette Goddard says to Darro "you have makeup on." When Charlie Chaplin asks for the telegram, he is told by Darro that "the envelops is empty." Look for a young Jean Harlow on the arm of George Raft and Arline Judge. This film is part of the added features on the double feature DVD by Catcom Home Video ...

 


NO. B-9 (1934)


Jimmy Durante asks popular song writing team Mack Gordon and Harry Revel to demonstrate some of their songs. There is interplay with impersonator Florence Desmond, Ben Turpin, Rudy Vallee and many others.

 




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Detail

Hollywood on Parade (1932 - 1934) is a series of short subjects released by Paramount Pictures

NO. A-1 (1932)
In the first entry of this series, the show open with a troupe of dancing chorus girls getting a salute from crossed-eyed Ben Turpin. Then the master of ceremonies, Fredric March, brings on the various acts, starting with a pre-teen Mitzi Green), dressed as an adult and singing "Was That the Human Thing to Do?" , followed by Ginger Rogers and Jack Oakie singing-and-dancing to "The Girl Who Used to be You." Then the Three Brox Sisters do a triple imitation of Marlene Dietrich singing 'Falling in Love Again." 'Jack Duffy' does a drunken hillbilly bit involving a lamp post, the the finale has Eddie Peabody, playing a banjo for some chorus girls on a pedestal.

 

NO. A-2 (1932)
In this installment, several stars are on hand to plug The Big Broadcast. Harold Grayson's orchestra plays the "Hollywood on Parade" theme song, and then announcer Stuart Erwin introduces Bing Crosby. Bing doesn't sing straight off because first we get a bit of comedy with George Burns and Gracie Allen. After this though Bing performs "Auf Wiedersehen, My Dear." The rest of the show is devoted to supposedly proving that screen comedians are as funny off-screen as they are in their pictures. Ole Olsen and Chic Johnson and a number of gals are shown on the beach doing their thing.

 

NO. A-3 (1932)
Eddie Kane wanders round the studio back-lot, opening various doors to see which stars pop out.

 

NO. A-3 (1933 version)
In this comedy short subject, Benny Rubin acts the part of a judge, passing judgment on various performers and their acts. He scuffles with Neil Hamilton, scrutinizes Fifi D'Orsay's song, reminisces with Baby Peggy, and shows a song performed at Tom Mix's home.

 

NO. A-4 (1933)
This ostensible documentary short subject features "mailman" Eddie Borden delivering mail to various Hollywood stars including Richard Arlen and his wife Jobyna Ralston, Tom Mix, Bing Crosby, and Mary Pickford. Eddie really wants to be offered something to drink, but no one seems to pick up on his desire. Pickford gives him a lift to the studio, where Eddie is left high and dry.

 

NO. A-6 (1933)
In this installment, Arlen the Great (also sometimes known as Arlen, Richard) puts on a magic show. He shows us a mummy he brought with him from Egypt, which turns out to look vaguely like Frances Dee. The rest of the show revolves around making playing cards come to life. Clark Gable is the King of Hearts, and Tallulah Bankhead is the Queen of Diamonds. Tallulah sings "It Had to Be That Way" perched atop a piano. Finally, we learn that the Jack of Clubs is Lew Cody and the Joker is Buster Keaton. Buster shows Lew and us his "new dry land cruiser."

 

NO. A-8 (1933)
In the Hollywood Hall of Fame - a wax museum - the figure of Eddie Borden comes to life and introduces us to various stars in effigy. Pining over the effigy of Clara Bow, her husband Rex Bell suggests that Eddie get on with Betty Boop. Betty asks Eddie to accompany her in a rendition of "My Silent Love."

 

NO. A-9 (1933)
Portraits on the wall of Willy Pogany's studio come to life.

 

NO. A-12 (1933)
In this short subject, performer Cliff Edwards introduces musical numbers and archival footage of various Hollywood stars, connecting them loosely with a "tribute" to theme songs -- none of which actually are theme songs. Clarence Muse performs a song of his own composition, and a mariachi band plays a musical tribute to Lupe Velez. Other footage shows the stars visiting the Caliente racetrack in Mexico.

 

HOLLYWOOD ON PARADE (1934)
Songwriter Mack Gordon introduces flagpole sitter Shipwreck Kelly, who hoists some girls aloft with him and shows them sights around Hollywood. Various stars appear in staged scenes (El Brendel, Viola Dana, Bing Crosby, Harry Langdon), while others show up in clips from newsreel or promotional footage. Most of the stars are seen in some sort of sporting activity such as tennis or golf.

 

NO. B-1 (1934)
Short film filled with cameo appearances by many of the top film stars of the time. The best scene is at the film premiere, apparently the premiere was a costume event and many of the stars are dressed in various costumes. The stars would stop and pose for the newsreel cameras and then Frankie Darro would go up to them and either ask for an autograph or tell the stars he is there to deliver a telegram. Apparently the stars didn't know they were being filmed for a short subject. This film has a sound track and you can hear many of the stars make remarks to Darro, oblivious to the fact that they were being filmed. Constance Cummings tells Darro "her hands are shaking she is so cold." Paulette Goddard says to Darro "you have makeup on." When Charlie Chaplin asks for the telegram, he is told by Darro that "the envelops is empty." Look for a young Jean Harlow on the arm of George Raft and Arline Judge. This film is part of the added features on the double feature DVD by Catcom Home Video ...

 

NO. B-9 (1934)
Jimmy Durante asks popular song writing team Mack Gordon and Harry Revel to demonstrate some of their songs. There is interplay with impersonator Florence Desmond, Ben Turpin, Rudy Vallee and many others.

 

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